Buy Ebira Native Attires.
Lifestyle

The Heartbreaking Tale of “Kidney Village”: How Poverty Led to Organ Trafficking in HOKSE

59
×

The Heartbreaking Tale of “Kidney Village”: How Poverty Led to Organ Trafficking in HOKSE

Share this article
The Heartbreaking Tale of "Kidney Village": How Poverty Led to Organ Trafficking in HOKSE

In the remote village of HOKSE in Nepal lies a community burdened by extreme poverty and desperation, earning it the grim moniker of “Kidney Village” or “Kidney Valley.” Here, the dire circumstances have driven many residents to sell their kidneys in exchange for meager sums of money, plunging them into a cycle of exploitation and despair.

The villagers of HOKSE face unimaginable hardships, struggling to afford basic necessities like shelter and food. For them, every day is a battle for survival, and the temptation of quick cash becomes an irresistible lifeline. Tragically, they fall prey to kidney traffickers who deceive them with false promises, offering as little as £1,300 for their organs.

Geeta, a 37-year-old woman from the village, shares her harrowing experience of being duped into selling her kidney. Persuaded by her sister-in-law, she and her husband made the agonizing decision to part with their organs, believing the misconception that kidneys grow back after removal. They received a paltry sum of 200,000 Nepalese Rupees, which they used to purchase their “dream” home and property.

However, their hopes were shattered when a devastating earthquake struck Nepal in 2015, claiming thousands of lives and leaving countless others homeless. Geeta’s dream home, acquired through the sale of her kidney, was reduced to rubble, leaving her with nothing but regret and despair.

The Heartbreaking Tale of "Kidney Village": How Poverty Led to Organ Trafficking in HOKSE

The aftermath of the earthquake plunged many villagers into despair, driving them to alcoholism as a means of coping with their loss and trauma. Meanwhile, kidney traders continued to exploit vulnerable individuals in HOKSE, targeting children with disabilities and offering them as little as £160 for their organs, which are then sold for exorbitant profits.

Shocking statistics reveal that a staggering 42 percent of HOKSE residents resorted to selling their kidneys to acquire land or housing, according to a 2014 survey by the Asian Foundation. In response to these appalling practices, the Nepalese government enacted legislation to prohibit the sale of kidneys, aiming to curb the exploitation of vulnerable communities.

Despite these efforts, the plight of “Kidney Village” serves as a poignant reminder of the devastating impact of poverty and desperation. It underscores the urgent need for comprehensive measures to address systemic issues of inequality and exploitation, ensuring that no individual is forced to sacrifice their health and dignity in pursuit of survival.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *